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Amazon Zocalo, Google Orkut, and Twitter Analytics | This Week In Social Media

ZocaloAmazon Zocalo

Move over, Google Docs, there’s a new player in town. Amazon announced its own document storage and sharing tool this week, Zocalo.

Like Docs, Zocalo allows users to store and sync documents across devices – but it also allows allows users to offer feedback on content and place comments in specific areas of a PDF or webpage (see the image to the right). However, the real difference that may attract more corporate networks is Zocalo’s ability to be set up with existing corporate credentials.

To use Zocalo, it will set you back only $5 per month for 200GB of storage, but customers with Amazon WorkSpaces get 50GB of free storage  - or pay $2 per month for the full 200GB. Zocalo is available now for limited preview.

Google kills Orkut

Google is killing off its first venture into social media…no, not Google+.

Orkut gained limited success in the U.S. since it launched in 2004, but gained much more popularity in Brazil and India where it was a top contender for Facebook as the dominant social platform for quite some time. However, fending off Facebook is like trying to hold back the ocean, with Orkut slowly losing popularity and users.

Google told user this week it would end Orkut in September, but wi Google has said it would preserve an archive of all Orkut communities that will be available from September 30

Twitter analytics are here

We knew it was only a matter of time, but Twitter has officially unveiled its own analytics measurement. Users can use the Twitter Analytics tool to track mentions, follows, and unfollows in 6-hour increments; view favorites, retweets, and replies for recent tweets; and display best (top 15% engagement) and good (top two-thirds engagement) tweets. In the “Followers” tab, users can access more detailed information on their followers’ locations, interests, and genders, as well as viewing the top accounts that their followers also follow. Data!

A Boost in Facebook Engagements, Reverse Yelp and Google Cardboard | This Week in Social Media

like message on keyboard button, social media conceptsFacebook’s best year ever?

It’s good to be a brand on Facebook right now - IF your content is popular. That’s according to a recent study that says the algorithm change so many brands and companies dreaded may actually be helping to give brands a boost in Facebook engagements.

That algorithm works to place higher-quality content in front of more people, meaning the days of posts reading “LIKE FOR X OR COMMENT FOR Y” and generating thousands of interactions are mostly over. The study indicates that more brands seem to be aware of the algorithm change and are focusing on better content to engage their fans – and it’s paying off.

Reverse Yelp

Are you an all-star diner, or your server’s worst nightmare? Good and bad behavior may not have had an impact on your dining experience from place-to-place before, but now some restaurants in Australia are using its version of OpenTable to rate and track its patrons.

What’s more, restaurants can add information about you to the network, like allergies, birthdays, anniversaries, what you like to eat and drink – as well as what kind of diner you are. This means things like frequent complaints and bad tips will also be documented, so don’t be too surprised if you’re constantly sitting near the bathroom if you aren’t terribly kind!

Cardboard is in right nowGoogle Cardboard

Forget watches and glasses, Google wants you to engage with cardboard! Kind of. This week, at Google I/O  the company handed out something called Google Cardboard in the last few minutes of its keynote to attendees. In an Ikea-like packaging, the “device” resembles a cardboard Viewmaster once assembled. You then place your phone in and are able to view 2D images in 3D with the aid of the Cardboard app. Fun fact: this type of technology (stereoscopic imagery, not apps; those are new) was made popular around the time of the American Civil War.

 

Google Mail, Plus Changes and the Oscars Will Stream Live | This Week in Social Media

Google+ for Android phones gets photo editing funness

Android users with Google+ accounts just got a nice upgrade to that app and its use of pictures. The updategives users a variety of new editing options with their photos, including: filters, cropping, rotating, and Snapseed-inspired enhancements (like Drama, Retrolux, and HDR Scape). The basic layout has changed too, giving users a simpler view of all photos in their library – unless you’re one of those people with thousands and thousands of photos. You’ll have to wait a bit longer to see everything at once…or start deleting those extra photos of Grumpy Cat you keep around.

Unsubscribe made easy

If you’re sick and tired of those marketing e-mails you signed up for in college to get a free pizza and could never figure out how to get them to stop coming – you’re in luck. This week Google announced a change to its Gmail program to give users a simple and easy way to unsubscribe to those pesky e-mails. Instead of combing the message for the unsubscribe like you will now be given the option to unsubscribe from the e-mail with a link at the top of the e-mail. While it may be a nice change for consumers, some businesses that rely on e-mail marketing may not find the change as helpful.

Who needs TV to watch the Oscars? Not you.

If you won’t be near a television on Sunday night to watch the 86th Academy Awards – or just feel like being extra fancy – you can watch the show through a live stream on your tablet or smartphone.

ABC will stream the Oscars through its Watch ABC app and WatchABC.com. Of course, you will still need to have a TV subscription service to watch the show. The Academy Awards being at 8:30 P.M. EST on Sunday.

Facebook Tweaks Liking, Google Field Trips, Intergalactic Gaga and TWTR goes Live | This Week in Social Media

Like as we Know it has Ended

Facebook altered its famous Like button this week. The first time in, well, ever. The social networking giant unveiled its newly redesigned Like and Share buttons with a bluer background and Helvetica font. The iconic thumbs up icon is also no more (aw). While it may seem a simple to many, Facebook says it took about six months to design and the approval of numerous people at Facebook (including founder and CEO, Mark Zuckerberg) to finally sign off on and move forward with the redesign.

Google Hangouts Make Field Trips Fun Again

Let’s face it, after you’ve seen your town’s local museum for the fifth time by the third grade, field trips just aren’t that much fun – or educational – any longer. However, a new initiative by Google called “Connected Classrooms” means to change all of that. Google is encouraging teachers to utilize Google Hangouts to bring students to places they normally wouldn’t be able to go to (affordably). Multiple organizations have partnered with Google to offer the inside looks at their facilities and connect with educators hoping to bring exciting content into the classroom.

Gaga in Spaaaaaace!

Boldly going where no celebrity performance has ever gone before: space; the final frontier. In 2015, Lady Gaga will be the first artist to perform in outer space. The “Applause” singer will be aboard a Virgin Galactic shuttle and entertain as part of Zero G Colony high-tech musical festival in New Mexico. Despite only performing one song, she’s bringing her entire entourage with her and has, reportedly, taken out a ridiculous life insurance policy. Way to play it safe, Gaga.

Oh yea, Twitter Went Public

You didn’t really think we’d forget, did you? Yesterday, Twitter stock appeared on the New York Stock Exchange and, despite some reports calling it overpriced, shot up from $26 a share to more than $45. Before you go thinking you’ll get rich off of Twitter, you may want to do a bit of research.

Auto-completing Ads, Targeting Tweets and Editing Vines | This Week in Social Media

Google auto-complete makes for powerful advertising

The auto-complete function in Google search took center stage in a viral UN Women campaign this week, drawing attention to sexism and gender discrimination around the world. The ads depict popular Google searches beginning with phrases like “women should” to illustrate widespread sexism. The tactic was so successful it has already been re-purposed for another UN campaign taking aim at homophobia.

Twitter hits target

This week Twitter announced Tweet Delivery by Country— a geo-targeting tool that will allow marketers to post targeted tweets to followers based on their country. The feature should help solve the language problem that drives many global brands to manage multiple Twitter accounts in various languages to reach a worldwide fan base. Twitter advertisers have been able to geo-target promoted tweets for a while now, but expanding the feature is a smart move on Twitter’s part to become more appealing to marketers as the company approaches its stock market debut.

Vine gives video artists some room to work

Twitter-owned Vine is also making some changes to give mini-movie makers more artistic flexibility within the app.  A new “sessions” feature will allow users to save drafts of up to ten works-in-progress at a time, and “time travel” will give users the opportunity to edit or replace shots within a post before publishing. Good news for aspiring masters of the 6-second video loop and their followers.

Google’s Gone (not provided) – What It Means for SEO

Back in October of 2011, Google decided to change the way they pass along keyword data. When a Google Search user was logged into a Google product (Gmail, Google+, or any other Google account), their search terms were hidden, or otherwise, encrypted from being passed along to any analytics program through what is called SSL protection.  This resulted in what is known as “(not provided)” keywords that many search marketers have become all-too-familiar with over the past two years.

Figure 1: http://www.notprovidedcount.com/ has been tracking 60 sites percentages of (not provided) data since October 2011

Initially, (not provided) keywords represented a small percentage.  As this began to plateau, it was commonplace to see about 15-20% of all keywords labeled as (not provided).  Even as recently as April 2013, few people saw numbers much above 20%, but then things started to creep upwards… June 30%… August 40%… September 60%… and the numbers will go up until they can’t anymore.  Judging by search share numbers, we would estimate the climb to stop near 75%, which is approximately the ceiling of Google Search share of market.  Many marketers are already seeing this.

What does that mean for my Brand?

We need to assume that we will no longer have access to data such as visits, conversions and bounce rates for individual keywords.  For example, we will no longer be able to report that “The keyword ‘widget’ drove 250 organic visits, resulting in 10 sales during the month of October”.  (We will still be able to retrieve performance data for individual keywords on Bing and Yahoo!.)

How much this matters is really a function of how much your success really depends on that level of granular control. If you’re an e-commerce site that’s tweaking things every day based on organic keywords, and making decisions that impact tomorrow’s content creation, then that’s one thing, but for most sites – including our clients – we’re acting on directional trends, across clusters and weeks. It’s easy to feel you “need” this level of detail, when it’s not usually as meaningful as it seems it should be. PPC is really where this degree of granularity makes a big difference, and that’s not going away.

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FDA’s AOR, Breaking Bad and Google’s Birthday | This Week in Social Media


The FDA Taps Agency for Social Media

Social media has become so ubiquitous that even the Food and Drug Administration has allocated part of its budget to managing and monitoring their social media channels through an agency. IB5k, which worked with the 2008 Obama campaign, will be paid $182,814 to provide “comprehensive coverage” of the FDA’s social media properties, which includes Facebook and Twitter. Though IB5k doesn’t appear to explicitly offer social media services, they do appear to create apps and video and have monitoring experience. Free advice: monitor those Facebook comments a little closer (“flu shots are POISON!!!!!!!!!!) and good luck being better than this fellow government organization on Instagram.

Netflix Has Your Back, Breaking Bad Fans

Social media has made television watching more social and a lot more spoiled. Remember the red wedding, Game of Thrones fans? Remember the series finale of Dexter, nine people who still watch that show? Now, more than ever, if you don’t watch the show live with everyone else, you risk inadvertently running into spoilers if you jump on any of your social platforms. Thank you Netflix. The streaming giant has created Spoiler Foiler, which, should you sign up and check Twitter this Sunday during or after the big Breaking Bad series finale, will replace spoilers with blacked out lines. The nifty platform is only for Breaking Bad right now, but who knows if it’ll port over to other major shows like The Walking Dead, Boardwalk Empire or Duck Dynasty (SPOILER ALERT! The guys with the beards crack wise). Now that that’s out of the way, who do you think the ricin is for?

Happy 15th Birthday, Google

Fifteen years ago today, Larry Page and Sergey Brin created Google in their garage office in California. Things are a little different these days with Google Glass, the new Hummingbird search algorithm update and shares trading north of $875 (I’ll take two!). There have been some rocky times (the death of Google Reader, Google+ jokes) but Googling sure beats asking a butler named Jeeves if cats can sweat.

FDA's AOR, Breaking Bad and Google’s Birthday | This Week in Social Media


The FDA Taps Agency for Social Media

Social media has become so ubiquitous that even the Food and Drug Administration has allocated part of its budget to managing and monitoring their social media channels through an agency. IB5k, which worked with the 2008 Obama campaign, will be paid $182,814 to provide “comprehensive coverage” of the FDA’s social media properties, which includes Facebook and Twitter. Though IB5k doesn’t appear to explicitly offer social media services, they do appear to create apps and video and have monitoring experience. Free advice: monitor those Facebook comments a little closer (“flu shots are POISON!!!!!!!!!!) and good luck being better than this fellow government organization on Instagram.

Netflix Has Your Back, Breaking Bad Fans

Social media has made television watching more social and a lot more spoiled. Remember the red wedding, Game of Thrones fans? Remember the series finale of Dexter, nine people who still watch that show? Now, more than ever, if you don’t watch the show live with everyone else, you risk inadvertently running into spoilers if you jump on any of your social platforms. Thank you Netflix. The streaming giant has created Spoiler Foiler, which, should you sign up and check Twitter this Sunday during or after the big Breaking Bad series finale, will replace spoilers with blacked out lines. The nifty platform is only for Breaking Bad right now, but who knows if it’ll port over to other major shows like The Walking Dead, Boardwalk Empire or Duck Dynasty (SPOILER ALERT! The guys with the beards crack wise). Now that that’s out of the way, who do you think the ricin is for?

Happy 15th Birthday, Google

Fifteen years ago today, Larry Page and Sergey Brin created Google in their garage office in California. Things are a little different these days with Google Glass, the new Hummingbird search algorithm update and shares trading north of $875 (I’ll take two!). There have been some rocky times (the death of Google Reader, Google+ jokes) but Googling sure beats asking a butler named Jeeves if cats can sweat.

Instagram hits the big screen, Google searches for immortality, and Pinterest sells things | This Week in Social Media

Royal Caribbean puts Instagram videos on the big screen

Royal Caribbean Australia is laying claim to the world’s first Instagram film contest. The cruise line is asking fans from Australia and New Zealand to submit 15-second videos of their “wow moments” and vote for their favorite entries to determine which 100 videos will be featured in a real-life film festival. It wasn’t long ago Instagram’s short video competitor, Vine, made it to the Tribeca Film Festival. Could it be we’re entering a golden age of micro-movies? If these festival submissions fail to impress, well, at least they’ll have a captive audience—the festival films will be screened aboard one of the company’s ships in February 2014.

Search: (sickness AND death) OR (mortality) AND (solved)

Google CEO and co-founder Larry Page has announced the company’s next challenge: human mortality. The latest of Google’s moon shots—as Page calls the company’s most ambitious projects—will be the launch of Calico, a new health and wellness company that will seek a solution to the physical deterioration and illness that is part of human life. First step? Data analysis. And you thought Chromecast was the best thing Google did for you.

Pinterest adds ads

In a dramatic turn of events, Pinterest will begin featuring pictures of stuff you’ll want to buy. The network has started placing promoted pins in users’ feeds in an inevitable attempt to earn advertising dollars. Pinterest has already gained the loyalty of some big-name retailers, so the move comes as no surprise, and promoted pins probably won’t be as intrusive as upcoming Instagram ads. Given the nature of Pinterest content, will we really even notice when we’re explicitly being sold a product? Probably not.

Instagram hits the big screen, Google searches for immortality, and Pinterest sells things | This Week in Social Media

Royal Caribbean puts Instagram videos on the big screen

Royal Caribbean Australia is laying claim to the world’s first Instagram film contest. The cruise line is asking fans from Australia and New Zealand to submit 15-second videos of their “wow moments” and vote for their favorite entries to determine which 100 videos will be featured in a real-life film festival. It wasn’t long ago Instagram’s short video competitor, Vine, made it to the Tribeca Film Festival. Could it be we’re entering a golden age of micro-movies? If these festival submissions fail to impress, well, at least they’ll have a captive audience—the festival films will be screened aboard one of the company’s ships in February 2014.

Search: (sickness AND death) OR (mortality) AND (solved)

Google CEO and co-founder Larry Page has announced the company’s next challenge: human mortality. The latest of Google’s moon shots—as Page calls the company’s most ambitious projects—will be the launch of Calico, a new health and wellness company that will seek a solution to the physical deterioration and illness that is part of human life. First step? Data analysis. And you thought Chromecast was the best thing Google did for you.

Pinterest adds ads

In a dramatic turn of events, Pinterest will begin featuring pictures of stuff you’ll want to buy. The network has started placing promoted pins in users’ feeds in an inevitable attempt to earn advertising dollars. Pinterest has already gained the loyalty of some big-name retailers, so the move comes as no surprise, and promoted pins probably won’t be as intrusive as upcoming Instagram ads. Given the nature of Pinterest content, will we really even notice when we’re explicitly being sold a product? Probably not.